Orca 3.5, Part 1: Huge time savings from at-a-glance notifications and new automations

Orca version 3.5 has so many new time-saving notifications and automations we had to break the listing into two parts. Here is part 1.

The Orca team is very excited about this release, which provides more efficiencies, easier debugging, new workflow functionality, and more. We think you’ll like it!

WAS Status Interface

Orca has a new WAS interface that inventories the run status for WAS applications and application servers.

Now you can easily see and monitor applications and application servers for unexpected runtime status.

You can also stop, start, or restart applications and application servers through Orca without any scripting. These new steps can also be included in your configuration change and/or deployment workflows. Learn more about automating WebSphere Application Server configuration management here

Workflow Promotion

Configuration Templates functionality has been added to support the promotion of configuration settings from an existing node to another node in the same ecosystem or even in a different ecosystem. Configuration templates enable the reuse of configuration data across any number of target nodes and take care of any environment-specific pathing or tokens. This is especially useful in WebSphere Application Server environments where cell names or other attributes may be different between Dev, UAT, and Production.

Configuration templates are created using the same steps you’d normally take to update a node. Once the collection of relevant configuration data has been identified, tokens can be defined to handle server and environment-specific differences, and the collection saved as a template for use in future workflows in other environments.

This is a big time saver. You no longer have to create new templates for each of your environments. Just reuse and recycle in a few clicks!

Central Log Monitor for Faster Orca Debugging

On occasion, some users run into networking or communications issues when getting Orca initially configured. This is understandable since everyone’s environments are so different. The old way of debugging network/agent connectivity issues was to look at the logs and run commands directly on the agent servers. Now you won’t have to do that anymore with Orca’s central log monitor. Easily see real-time debugging logs of the Orca Engine and remote Agents directly from the Orca Console. When the log monitor is enabled, a new tab is created that shows diagnostic output from the Orca Console as well as any remote agents you want to monitor.

Deployed Applications Tab

Each node now has a Deployed Applications tab that details the applications that have been deployed to that node, including who deployed it, when it was deployed, and if it passed or failed. This report also shows all the artifact information, such as which version was pulled from the artifact repository, its path, hash, and more.

Updates to existing to Windows Interfaces

  • The Windows System Services and Windows Features interfaces can now return a filtered inventory for specified names. For example, you can choose just to inventory specific System Services. This is a great option if you only want to monitor specific Services and Features.
  • The SQL Server “Run SQL Server Commands” activity can now be run using a Windows user credential as an alternate credential (instead of just a SQL Server user credential).
  • There is a new global option for Windows configuration change jobs to exit the task immediately after the first commit error instead of continuing forward.

Updates to existing Linux/Unix Interfaces

  • The System Services interface can now return a filtered inventory for specified names. For example, you can choose just to inventory specific System Services. This is a great option if you only want to monitor specific Services.
  • There is a new global option for Linux/Unix configuration change jobs to exit the task immediately after the first commit error instead of continuing forward.

And, there’s more! Part 2 of Orca’s 3.5 announcement outlines new Linux-Unix interfaces, “apply to and from” comparison screens, Oracle back-end support, multiple compliance rule sets, token separation on nodes and more. 

Start your free trial by accessing an online installation of Orca.